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Archive for October, 2009

Oct 29 2009

TRADEMARK: What’s in a name?

trademark1You worked hard thinking of that perfect name for your restaurant, you spent a small fortune and countless hours marketing that name, and because of all your efforts that name has developed a great “buzz” and reputation in New York. . . and less than a year later another restaurant opens up in NYC with almost the same name as yours! To make matters worse, people are now going to that other restaurant thinking that it’s yours! What do you do?

If you had your restaurant’s name “trademarked,” you would call your attorney, he/she would draft and send a “cease and desist” letter to your competitor, and you would put that competitor out of business or at the very least force them to change the name of their restaurant.

GENERAL RULE: Trademark registration for the name of a restaurant or bar should be done for EVERY establishment so long as it can be done.

A trademark is any word, name or symbol adopted and used by a person (or that person has a bona fide intent to use that word, name or symbol and subsequently does use it) that identifies and distinguishes his or her goods or services from those manufactured and sold by others, and indicates the source of those goods or services. Names of restaurants, as long as they are not generic or merely descriptive, are terrific candidates for trademark registration. Additionally, a trademark is considered an asset which is not only valuable to a business but invaluable to a business if you are considering opening more than one establishment with the same name or ultimately licensing and/or franchising your concept.

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Oct 01 2009

EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT: Keeping Key Personnel

As the owner of a restaurant, you should consider providing your key personnel with employment contracts. The employment contract will provide the employee with job security, will clarify all of the conditions and duties of employment, and will create a contractual obligation for them to be employed for the term of the contract.

GENERAL RULE: While there is no required form that the contract must take, certain key provisions should be included, such as the (i) term (i.e. length of employment), (ii) compensation, (iii) employees duties and obligations, (iv) confidentiality, non-disclosure, non-compete, and non-solicit provisions, and (v) grounds for termination or a “Just Cause” clause.

The more detail contained in the contract, the less room for disagreement during the employment period. As an owner, be sure to have the “Just Cause” clause worded in a manner that allows you to terminate the employee during the term, without any penalty, if the employee engages in negligence, misconduct, excessive absences, drug use, theft, fraud, fails to perform his duties in a professional manner, performs an act or omission of an act that could be deemed injurious to the company financially or to its reputation, or is convicted (or a plea of no contest) of any misdemeanor or felony.

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